Hi, I'm Ramses

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Florida . Graphic Designer . Pseudo-Poet
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pureblyss:

Just a little shoutout to Ramses who got MARRIED today. Craziness. Congrats, tumblr friend! You are an inspiration to all of us “original” tumblrers! You and your wife are going to do some awesome things for Him, I just know it. Thank you for showing the world who Jesus is and what love looks like. We all need more of that.

Omg. thanks so much, girl! I don’t even think it has registered yet in my brain that I’m married and have a wife, haha! Thank you for the kind words, though. Everyone is growing up and getting married aaahhh, so many tears lol

aizenaku:

Based a comic off of hislivingpoetry's poem because I loved it so much. Thanks for letting me use it!

Literally crying because this ridiculously talented illustrator took one of my poems and brought it to life! IT’S SO DAMN CUTE. I WANT TO FRAME IT AND HANG IT ON MY WALL<33

(via cryokineticwolfies)

#aizenaku  

What the church does with its creeds and its doctrine of tradition; it flattens out all the images and metaphors to make it fit into a nice little formulation and then it’s deathly…if you want a God that is healthier than that, you’re going to have to take time to sit with these images [of God from the book of Isaiah] and relish them and let them become a part of your prayer life and your vocabulary and your conceptual frame. Otherwise you’re just going to be left with these dead formulations.

Which is why the poetry is so important because the poetry just keeps opening and opening and opening whereas the doctrinal practice of the church is always to close and close and close until you are left with nothing that has any transformative power. So more metaphors gives more access to God. One can work one metaphor a while - but you can’t treat that as though that’s the last word - and you gotta move and have another and another.

Walter Brueggemann, Interview with Krista Tippet for On Being: Walter Brueggemann on the Prophetic Image

(via yesdarlingido)

Every one of us is in the image of God, and every one of us is like a damaged icon. But if we were given an icon damaged by time, damaged by circumstances, or desecrated by human hatred, we would treat it with reverence, with tenderness, with broken-heartedness. We would not pay attention primarily to the fact that it is damaged, but to the tragedy of its being damaged. We would concentrate on what is left of its beauty, and not on what is lost of its beauty. And this is what we must learn to do with regard to each person as an individual, but also – and this is not always as easy – with regard to groups of people, whether it be a parish or a denomination, or a nation. We must learn to look, and look until we have seen the underlying beauty of this group of people. Only then can we even begin to do something to call out all the beauty that is there. Listen to other people, and whenever you discern something which sounds true, which is a revelation of harmony and beauty, emphasize it and help it to flower. Strengthen it and encourage it to live

Metropolitan Anthony Bloom

(via effervescentreflections)

(via rebelsigh)

superdanger-us:

Apartment Number 9 x Carnivore Cabernet Dinner Series: Vol. II | Pilsen - Chicago, IL.

Check out the video I shot here

(via danielalaa)

humansofnewyork:

The woman in the blue coat approached me by the United Nations building yesterday, and said: ‘There is an interesting man around the corner that you should photograph. I don’t know his name, but everyday he stands directly across from the UN, and says ‘God Bless You’ to everyone who walks past. I’ve always sort of viewed him as the conscience of the world.’'Let's go together,' I said, and she agreed to bring me to where he was standing. When we finally found the man, I asked for his photo, and he cheerfully agreed. But he pointed at a nearby wall:"Let’s take the photo under that scripture," he said.
Beautiful.

humansofnewyork:

The woman in the blue coat approached me by the United Nations building yesterday, and said: ‘There is an interesting man around the corner that you should photograph. I don’t know his name, but everyday he stands directly across from the UN, and says ‘God Bless You’ to everyone who walks past. I’ve always sort of viewed him as the conscience of the world.’
'Let's go together,' I said, and she agreed to bring me to where he was standing. When we finally found the man, I asked for his photo, and he cheerfully agreed. But he pointed at a nearby wall:
"Let’s take the photo under that scripture," he said.


Beautiful.

Just finished applying for like 8 different jobs in Lynchburg. I really need to find something within the next couple of weeks so that when my fiance and I move up there, I can help support us. At this point, any full-time job would do. If you guys can pray that I would find something soon, or just send good vibes my way, I’d appreciate it! 

Bless!

killianandco asked: I get the point but the death of Christ is the key that leads us into a relationship with Him isn't it?. If it wasn't for His sacrifice we couldn't even be in right standing with Him let alone attempt to live a life in accordance to His example. I say this from a personal perspective not as a 'western christianity' defense.

As with everything in life I see it as a tension, one with out the other produces a skewed perspective. Salvation is not the pinnacle of our ‘christian walk’ but merely the entrance into a rich developing relationship with our Father.

I understand what you mean. I wasn’t trying to say it was either one or the other, so forgive me if it came off that way. I think both the death and life of Christ are of importance. I was just speaking on the disproportionate value and emphasis placed on his death, and not his life, and how that can lead into other forms of theology and ideology that are focused on escaping from hell to an other-worldly heaven instead of the Kingdom of God, here and now.

reunited-soul:

I will never understand why evangelicals care more about the death of Christ than how he lived his life

Probably because American Evangelicalism has been fused with American consumerism and so we’re only interested in focusing on that which benefits ME directly. In this case, the death of Christ “secures my eternal salvation” so it’s the primary aspect of Christ’s life/ministry that is given importance. The attitude is: Sure, we can learn something from Christ’s life but we’re mostly interested in salvation from Hell. And I don’t blame them, it’s how they were most likely presented with the “Good News.”

It’s something that’s made me increasingly uncomfortable with most of American Evangelicalism.